TPS083: Setting Up a Mix-Minus and Hosting Pitfalls

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If you want to record Skype using a mixer you’re going to need how to setup a mix-minus. The video below will show you how to go about setting that up and the linked post below will describe the entire process as well as show you detailed photographs of how to setup a mix-minus for recording Skype interviews.

A mix-minus allows you to send all the audio going into your mixer (voice, sound fx, music, etc) back to your caller on Skype without them getting their own voice back which would cause a feedback loop where they would hear their own voice. [Read more…]

TPS 079: An Alternative to Skype

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Ever have an issue with Skype? Choppy connection, hiss in your audio, disconnected from your interviewee or co-host? These are just a few of the issues some podcasters are experiencing when using Skype. However, Skype, in many cases still remains one of the better ways to connect with remote interviewees and co-hosts. But what if there was a reliable substitute? Enter Google Plus Hangouts and Hangouts On-Air.G+ Hangouts

If Skype is working great for your recordings, keep doing what you’re doing. But if you’re having any number of issues that Skype often has, consider trying Google Plus Hangouts. [Read more…]

PQT – Audio File Size vs Quality

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When you compress/export your final edited version of your podcast into an .mp3TPS Podcast Quick Tips ID3_300x300 audio file you have a couple decisions to make. How big or small do you want the file to be versus how good do you want it to sound?

There are many factors that can lead to a final decision regarding your podcast file. Here are a few factors that I take into consideration when compressing my .mp3 for release into the RSS feed. [Read more…]

TPS Ep. 060 – Starting Your First Podcast: A First Time Podcaster’s Experience

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From blogger to podcaster, Jeff Yin shares his experience of starting his very first podcast.

Jeff attended Blogworld NYC 2012 as a blogger and quickly learned he’d make a great podcaster after attending several of the podcasting track sessions including Podcasting 101 which I was a part of. One month later, Jeff had taken some basic gear he already owned and started his first podcast, Entrepreneurs with Day Jobs.

Find out the process he took to starting his new show and how a small budget, a little advice and some informed choices led to the start of a great sounding podcast. [Read more…]

How to Check the Size of Your RSS Feed

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If your RSS feed stops updating and you are using Feedburner, it’s likely that your feed size has become too large. Feedburner stops updating feeds when the size of your original feed is larger than 512 KB.

This video shows you how to check the size of your Feedburner feed so that you can avoid having your feed interrupted. Once your feed size goes back to being less than 512 KB’s, Feedburner will continue to update and deliver your RSS feed to your subscribers.

You can also reduce the amount of items in your feed to help prevent feed interruptions.

Check your feed’s size at Web-sniffer.net.

TPS Ep. 047 – Recording a Double-Ender Podcast

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When you want the absolute best quality recording from your remotely co-hosted podcast, you record a double-ender.

A double-ender is a type of recording where everyone on the podcast episode records their own audio. This allows for the cleanest sound possible, removing the unwanted noise problems you might get from such things as Skype or the telephone.

While this method does create more work for the editor (e.g. lining up clips, transferring files) you do end up with the best recording possible because everyone has recorded their microphones directly into their own software or recording device.

The basic workflow is as follows:
1. Everyone records their own audio (into Audacity or any other recording software or their own digital audio recorder).
2. Each person uploads their audio to a server so that the person doing the post production can gather all the audio files.
3. The editor lines up the audio tracks in an audio editor and does the normal post production (leveling, sweetening, etc.)
4. Export and finish the same way you would any other podcast episode (ID tags, show notes, etc).

In this episode I team up with Steve from NetcastStudio.com to record a double-ender podcast about recording double-ender podcasts. Listen as we describe the steps in detail and pay attention to the great sound quality we get from the process. It’s like we’re sitting in the same studio even though in reality I was on the East Coast and he is on the West.

Links mentioned in this episode
MicToob.com – A YouTube like site (user generated) dedicated to microphones (reviews, unboxings, demos, etc.)

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PQT – Promote Your Podcast by Notifying the People and Products You Mention

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Promote your podcast by contacting the people and or companies you mention in your show. Many times those people will respond by passing on your content to their community.

Whether it’s through a simple tweet or facebook post, your content gets exposed to infinite amounts of new listeners when it’s passed on by someone else. And typically when you are mentioning someone or something on your podcast, it’s something you are a fan of, use, or plan to buy. Therefore the person who you are most likely speaking kindly about or the product which you use and love is great promotion for them or their company.

In most cases when you let someone know that you are talking highly about them or their product, they have every motivation to pass that on to their community. You see it on the backs of books and website testimonials, people like it when you talk about them and their products.

So let them pay you back with a retweet, a facebook wall post, or maybe even a mention on their own show. Market your show and get your podcast in front of hundreds of new listeners just by making someone else aware that you talked about them.

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PQT – Choosing a Mixer for Podcasting

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When you’re deciding on what kind of mixer to get for your podcast there are several things to consider before making your purchase. I run through the most important things I think you should be looking for in a mixer that will be used for producing podcasts.

Some of the things I like to have in a mixer include USB 2.0 or better, insert channels to properly attached effects processors, real faders, mute buttons, and a few more things you’ll hear about on this episode.

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PQT – iTunes Store Approval Times for Podcast RSS Feeds

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How long does it take before a podcast RSS feed is accepted into the itunes store once you have submitted it?

When you’ve submitted your podcast to itunes and its not showing up in the itunes catalog, many podcasters start to worry that they did something wrong. So what do you do once you have submitted your RSS feed to itunes but it’s not showing up in the itunes store?

The answer is patience. In order to make sure your podcast has been submitted and is in the process of being reviewed, make sure you received the confirmation email that tells you that indeed your podcast RSS feed has been submitted to itunes. You should receive this email shortly after you submit your valid podcast feed.

Wait times for getting your podcast approved can be as long as 3 weeks or as quick as 30 minutes. Once your podcast has been reviewed by someone at apple (yes someone actually looks and/or listens to your podcast) you will receive an email telling you that your podcast has been accepted and the same email will contain very important information about your show such as links that you can use to find your show on the web and on itunes.

Make sure you save this email and archive it somewhere you will remember and access easily because almost certainly you will be looking for it again to use the important information contain within the email about your show.

download this episode’s mp3 (4.3 mbs|4.2 min)

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